Lighthouses of Australia Project - JUNE 00 BULLETIN
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Dear Friends
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New Pages for Australia
New Links for Australia
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Dear Friends

They're coming, but painful

Yes, there are some new pages on the way, but they are having a painful birth. Working hard to help set up our small businesses to for the start of the GST on the 1st July, selling my house and getting ready to travel overseas on an extended trip towards the end year.

Your photos and info have been collated as well as material collected from our South Australian Expedition and is now forming the basis of some potential new pages.

Hopefully there will be five or six new pages up over the next 2 months.

Meeting John Ibbotson

Over the last two and a half years of doing this project the efforts of other people and their passion for Australian Lighthouse have been brought to my attention.

Very early in the projects history I came across clippings about John Ibbotson whose aim was to be the first person to photograph every lighthouse in Australia.

John contacted me last year with the suggestion we should meet up sometime however we both went our on ways on trips and work commitments.

We only just missed meeting John by an hour and a half when we visited Green Cape last year.

Finally John rang several weeks ago and we decided that we should met before he went on his trip across the northern coastline of Australia in August and September as I would also be going overseas soon after that.

We meet last Sunday week at my place. Also there was Ed Kavaliunas who has taken many photos for the Project and has been on most of the expeditions.

It was interesting to talk to John about his American adventure and how on his return to Australia he developed and interest in photographing Australian Lighthouses.

We also discussed his proposed 8 week trip across the top of Australia to photograph some our most isolated lighthouses.

John has promised to deliver us a report of his adventures up North and hopefully he may be able to give us a briefing before he goes.

Good Luck John and we are looking forward to seeing some really great photos of lighthouses that the Project has had some difficulty in covering.

Malcolm, overworked and underpaid!. [Photograph: Deborah Taylor]
Malcolm Macdonald
[Photograph: Deborah Taylor]

eMail Malcolm


Letters & Notices:

Looking for Edward Vosti

Hi Malcolm,

I have an Edward Vosti who died 26.8.1927 in Flemington, Melbourne. His occupation is listed as lighthouse keeper in the Vic Probate

Does anyone have any ideas where I could find out more, e.g. what lighthouse he kept?

Cheers Jan Glasby <jan.glasby@hawkerc.act.edu.au>.

Feel free to post any request, letters, notices here regarding research, events etc for any Australian Lighthouse on this notice board.

<keeper@lighthouses.org.au


Department of Scrounge:

If anybody has any of this material on any Australian lighthouses including the ones listed at the Department of Scrounge it would appreciated, especially the high priority ones:

  • Original Colour Photographs
  • Historical Photographs or Postcards
  • History, experiences and anecdotes
  • Technical History

Please eMail <Keeper>


New Pages for Australia:

No new pages for Australia this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


New Links for Australia:

No new links for Australia this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Also, New Links for World:

No new links for World this month

If your e-mail does not display in HTML these pages can be accessed from the "New Listing for Month Index" at <http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/New/Index%20New.htm>


Australian News:

128-year-old Wollongong Lighthouse gets a facelift

[Nathan Simpson and Vanessa Mace, Wollongong Advertiser]

The Wollongong Harbour Lighthouse [Courtesy and Copyright Lightstorm Photography, Nowra.]
The Wollongong Harbour Lighthouse
[Courtesy and Copyright Lightstorm Photography, Nowra.]

After more than 120 years, the Old Wollongong Lighthouse is undergoing a facelift in the first year of the new millennium.

The lighthouse, built in 1872, is currently wrapped in plastic, as stage two of restoration work continues this week.

The lighthouse wrapped in scaffold and plastic during the restoration process (May 2000). [Photograph: Norbert Fischer]
The lighthouse wrapped in scaffold and plastic during the restoration process (May 2000).
[Photograph: Norbert Fischer]

Wollongong MP Colin Markham said the refurbishment and restoration of the Old Lighthouse would give Wollongong Harbour a facelift.

"Work on stabilising the foundations, repairing damage front corrosion and painting part of the exterior has already been completed from earlier funding allocations of some $100,000," he said.

The newly painted exterior and the lantern house removed for detailed restoration (June 2000). [Photograph: Norbert Fischer]
The newly painted exterior and the lantern house removed for detailed restoration (June 2000).
[Photograph: Norbert Fischer]

The second round of funding, estimated at $100,000, is to be spent on restoring the intricate detail of the lantern house as well as painting its structural interior.

"To enable the lantern house to be restored it's necessary for it to be temporarily removed from the top of the iron structure," Mr Markham said.

"Also, all work is being monitored by an historical archaeologist to ensure that the structure is restored to as near original condition as possible, considering the deterioration that has occurred over the years.

"A photographic record of the work is also being compiled as part of the project."

Workmen prepare to remove the lantern house (May 2000). Note Flagstaff Hill Lighthouse in background. [Photograph: Ian Clifford]
Workmen prepare to remove the lantern house (May 2000).
Note Flagstaff Hill Lighthouse in background.
[Photograph: Ian Clifford]

The crane is brought in to lift the lantern house (May 2000). [Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]
The crane is brought in to lift the lantern house (May 2000).
[Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]

Crane begins lift of the lantern house (May 2000). [Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]
Crane begins lift of the lantern house (May 2000).
[Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]

Crane continues lift of the lantern house (May 2000). [Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]
Crane continues lift of the lantern house (May 2000).
[Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]

Crane continues lift of the lantern house (May 2000). [Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]
Crane continues lift of the lantern house (May 2000).
[Photograph: Kim Stephenson, Department of Land & Water Conservation]

The lantern house is secured for transportation (May 2000). [Photograph: Ian Clifford]
The lantern house is secured for transportation (May 2000).
[Photograph: Ian Clifford]

The work is being carried out by contractors Tolco Pty Ltd and Steamit Pty Ltd in conjunction with the Land and Water Conservation Department.

A Conservation Management Plan, recently completed by the Land and Water Conservation Department, examined the historical, scientific and cultural significance of the 128-year-old structure.

Land and Water Conservation Minister Richard Amery joined Mr Markham in a visit to the lighthouse last week.

"As land managers for the site it is important that the state strives to maintain the man-made history of these small harbours," Mr Amery said.

"The elegant lighthouse is a symbol of the development of harbours along the NSW coast and structure as a symbol of its heritage."

Brian Dooley from the Department of Land and Water Conservation inspects conservation work at Wollongong௬dest lighthouse. [Photograph: Wollongong Advertiser]
Brian Dooley from the Department of Land and Water Conservation inspects conservation work at Wollongong௬dest lighthouse.
[Photograph: Wollongong Advertiser]

Brian Dooley, from the Department of Land and Water Conservation's Wollongong office said historians working on the conservation management plan had uncovered some interesting stories about the South Coast's oldest lighthouse.

"Furniture records show the lighthouse keeper was only allowed one piece of furniture – a chair," he said.

"This was so he would stay awake all night and not let the oil lamp go out."

When construction began on the lighthouse, the Advertiser's sister publication the Illawarra Mercury questioned whether the lighthouse would survive one bad storm.

It also predicted the lighthouse keeper would find it impossible to reach the lighthouse during bad weather.

Historic Jarman Island Lighthouse back in spotlight

[Sean Cowan, The West Australian]

The Jarman Island Lighthouse
The Jarman Island Lighthouse
[Photograph: <>]

More than 15 years after it's light was extinguished, the historic Jarman Island lighthouse has been officially recognised as an important part of North-West history.

The lighthouse - and nearby keeper's quarters - was one of 16 additions made to the Heritage Council of WA register in May.

But locals reckon it should have happened sooner.

Jarman Island is located about 3.5 kilometres from the historic shipping port of Cossack, near Roebourne.

The lighthouse, built in England in 1887 and shipped to Australia in parts, is one of few remaining cast iron lighthouses.

Mr Fairgrieve outside the lighthouse keeper's cottage wheer he lives. [Photograph: Robert Duncan]
Mr Fairgrieve outside the lighthouse keeper's cottage where he lives.
[Photograph: Robert Duncan]

Cossack caretaker, David Fairgrieve, said the lighthouse and quarters were of great importance to the area.

"You realise that when you consider all the ships that had to come into this harbour," he said.

"There was pearling here and then there were bigger ships to bring supplies to Marble Bar and Port Hedland."

"Cossack was what opened up the Pilbara and the Kimberley and the lighthouse was important to Cossack.

The Jarman Island caretaker, David Fairgrieve enjoying the natural surrounds of the lighthouse. [Photograph: Robert Duncan]
The Jarman Island caretaker, David Fairgrieve enjoying the natural surrounds of the lighthouse.
[Photograph: Robert Duncan]

The Jarman Island Lighthouse operated from 1887 to 1985.

Cossack originally named Butchers Inlet, was founded in 1863 as a landing place for pioneers.

By the late 1870s it was the North-West's major port but in 1904 a new jetty was built at Point Samson which became the new port for the area.

The defunct Jarman Island Lighthouse, built in 1887 and shipped in pieces from England. [Photograph: Dione Davidson]
The defunct Jarman Island Lighthouse, built in 1887 and shipped in pieces from England
[Photograph: Dione Davidson]

Mr Fairgrieve said the lighthouse and quarters would eventually be restored.

They are already classified by the National Trust of Australia.

It's lights out for keepers of the Prom.

[Jane Howard, Sunday Herald Sun]

The Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse [Photograph: Grant Maizels]
The Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse
[Photograph: Grant Maizels]

WANTED: One resilient couple, Jack of all trades with the patience of Job to care for the Australian mainland's southernmost lighthouse.

Million-dollar views, rent free.

After 21 years as lighthouse keepers, the last 12 atop a 180-metre cliff on the southern peninsula of Wilsons Promontory,

Pat and Peter Sutton, are retiring.

View to the future: Peter and Pat Sutton at Wilsons Promontory [Photograph: Craig Hughes]
View to the future: Peter and Pat Sutton at Wilsons Promontory
[Photograph: Craig Hughes]

Parks Victoria is mounting a search for another enterprising couple to take over the reins when the Suttons, both 64, finish on September 12.

In two weeks Parks Victoria will advertise in major metropolitan newspapers for a couple to live in this desolate but beautiful frontier.

Since 1859, the remote outpost has been a beacon for ships making the sometimes treacherous Bass Strait crossing,

And while the lighthouse has been automated since 1993, the lighthouse keepers or light station keepers as they are now known, are as vital as ever.

The Parks Victoria manager of Tidal River at Wilsons Promontory, Mr Noel Hutchinson, said the successful candidates should have a sound knowledge of minor mechanical and general maintenance work, horticulture, and the ability to perform a hosting role for hikers who often stay in cottages on the property.

"We are after a couple who can work in a fairly remote area, there is no vehicle access, you have to walk in for half an hour to get there," he said.

"It may suit people who have managed a bed and breakfast, someone who can keep the station maintained, look after the heritage and the customer service side.

"It is a 24-hour-a-day, seven-days-a-week operation and we need a handyman and chief cook 'n' bottlewasher."

The post is offered on a two-year contract with a mid-August start and the salary package is negotiable.

Mr Hutchinson said the new keepers would have a thorough induction and spend time learning the craft from the Suttons.

But newcomers beware: this is not a cushy posting-the Suttons' garage is 3km away "up and over" a mountain.

The remote Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse [Photograph: Kim Shimmin]
The remote Wilsons Promontory Lighthouse
[Photograph: Kim Shimmin]

Food supplies, fuel and general stores are flown in by helicopter every six to eight weeks.

It is 16km to the nearest bitumen road while the mail and any emergency groceries are 19km away at Tidal River.

And for hikers, who stay in the 22 bed accommodation and can not use Parks Victoria roads, it is a 38km return hike.

Despite the hard work, the Suttons say the rewards are many with ships, whales, dolphins, Tasmania and islands all part of the vista.

"The view is priceless and claimed to be the best from any lighthouse in Victoria," Mr Sutton sand.

My place is not for sale.

[Jane Howard, Sunday Herald Sun]

The lighthouse keeper Peter Sutton and his wife Pat [Photograph: Craig Hughes]
The lighthouse keeper Peter Sutton and his wife Pat
[Photograph: Craig Hughes]

Peter and Pat Sutton enjoy million dollar views from their home by mainland Australia's most southerly lighthouse.

The couple have shared the 1859 caretaker's cottage next to the remote Wilsons Promontory lighthouse since December 1987.

It is made of stone, has four bedrooms, an "exceptional dining room-kitchen", a lounge and 3.35-metre ceilings.

The light comes via solar energy and power is supplied via a wind generator.

While the lighthouse is now automated, the couple work hard maintaining the station properties, filing three-hourly weather reports and cleaning guest accommodation for up to 22 people.

"There are two main jobs,' Peter said.

"If it grows to your knees - mow it, and if it stands still it needs another can of paint.

"It is hard work - you have to enjoy your own company, be able to improvise and fix things and be healthy. Isolation is not a lot of fun if you get sick, but the view is priceless."

Mrs Sutton agrees.

"We are so glad we came," she said. "The outlook is stunning, even when it is foggy, with ships, seals, whales, and every day we look out and see Tasmania."

However, the couple will soon relinquish the view. They retire to Queensland in September.


Thanks to the Following People for Their Help in June:

Robert Innes (Photo)
Susan Brain (Photos & Info)
Paul Sofilas (News Article)
Denise Shultz (Photos)
Danielle Maassen (Photos)
Lorraine Symington (Info)
Elizabeth Reimer (Photograph)
David Roberts (Photographs)
Ian Clifford (Photographs)

Thanks to all the people who have put links to the site

Thanks to those who let me use their photos for thumbnails.


Regards until the Aug 2000 Bulletin
Malcolm Macdonald

http://www.lighthouses.org.au/lights/


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The JULY 00 BULLETIN was published on: 7/7/00

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Lighthouses of Australia Web Site First Published: 3/12/97

Photographs & Contributions:

AMSA for Photographs
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